Newsday TV Book Reviews

Medium Fun and Games: The Newsday Reviews of John Cashman

"Thanks for this! I grew up reading Newsday and remember Cashman's byline. Nice tribute!" -Shawn Levy, film critic (The Oregonian)

Monday, November 13, 2006

The Perennially Shirtless Alan Ladd...

I don't know exactly what the story is here, but John Cashman sure seemed to enjoy pointing out Alan Ladd's propensity for going shirtless in his films...

And Now Tomorrow (1944) "A young doctor from the wrong side of town (Alan Ladd, with and without his shirt) sets his cap for a rich girl who is deaf. Dr. Ladd clears that up without everyone ever saying he has a magnificent obsession. A couple of Kleenex."

Beyond Glory (1948) "A West Point cadet who is a bit long in the tooth (Alan Ladd with and without tunic) faces charges growing out of a World War II incident."

Botany Bay (1953) "[Stars] Alan Ladd, with and without his shirt."


Branded (1950) "Interesting, if expectable western that finds Alan Ladd (with and without his shirt) posing as wealthy rancher's long-lost son for monetary gain."

Drum Beat (1954) "Average Ladd, with and without his shirt."

Hell Below Zero (1954) "The antarctic, but Alan Ladd still gets his shirt off in this choppy tale of a whaling vessel, a woman and another man."

The Iron Mistress (1952) "Alan Ladd plays a steel-hard Jim Bowie (with and without a shirt) who, among other things, designed a knife. And there's something other-worldly about that weapon."


O.S.S. (1946) "The question is, does Alan take off his shirt or not?"

Santiago (1956) "Alan Ladd will sell guns and explosives to the highest bidder, but down deep he really is a fine person. And he gets to take his shirt off."

Saskatchewan (1954) "Alan Ladd and Shelley Winters are the mismatch of the year in this routine tale of cowboys, Indians and Mounties. And yes, Ladd gets to take his shirt off."

Thunder in the East (1953) "Alan Ladd is running guns (and taking his shirt off) again, this time to political elements in India."

Whispering Smith (1948) "Al, with and without shirt, is the quiet man of the title who speaks softly but carries a big gun. He breaks a train robbery and an old friend at the same time."

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